travertine

travertine
   1. Hard calcareous mineral deposited by flowing water, that is the same as the calcareous variety of sinter and comparable to the softer tufa. The term is normally used only for deposits formed outside caves, where plants and algae cause the precipitation by extracting carbon dioxide from the water and give travertine its porous structure. Travertine forms most commonly on waterfalls that build up like gour dams. Famous examples include those at Plitvice in Croatia, Dunn’s River Falls in Jamaica, and, largest of all, Band-I-Amir in Afghanistan [9].
   2. Calcium carbonate, CaCO3, light in color and generally concretionary and compact, deposited from solution in ground and surface waters. Extremely porous or cellular varieties are known as calcareous tufa, calcareous sinter, or spring deposit. Compact banded varieties, capable of taking a polish, are called onyx marble or cave onyx [10].
   3. Generally compact calcium carbonate rock formed by precipitation of soluble bicarbonates when equilibrium is lost due to changes in temperature and chemical characteristics. Soft, porous variety is called calcareous tufa [20].
   Synonyms: (French.) travertin; (German.) Kalktuff, Sinter, Travertin; (Greek.) travertinis/ asvestolithikos toffos; (Italian.) travertino; (Russian.) travertin; (Spanish.) travertino, toba; (Turkish.) traverten, sutaÕ2; (Yugoslavian.) sedra, travertin, bigar, lehnjak.
   Related to sinter and tufa.

A Lexicon of Cave and Karst Terminology with Special Reference to Environmental Karst Hydrology. . 2002.

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  • Travertine — is a sedimentary rock. It is a natural chemical precipitate of carbonate minerals; typically Aragonite, but often recrystallized to or primarily Calcite. Basically, calcium carbonate is deposited from the water of mineral springs or rivulets… …   Wikipedia

  • Travertine — Trav er*tine, n. [F. travertin, It. travertino, tiburtino, L. lapis Tiburtinus, fr. Tibur an ancient town of Latium, now Tivoli.] (Min.) A white concretionary form of calcium carbonate, usually hard and semicrystalline. It is deposited from the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • travertine — 1797, from It. travertino a kind of building stone, from L. tiburtinus, from Tiburs, adjective from Tibur (modern Tivoli), region in Latium …   Etymology dictionary

  • travertine — [trav′ər tēn΄, trav′ərtin] n. [It travertino, altered < tiburtino < L ( lapis) Tiburtinus, (stone) of Tibur (now Tivoli)] a light colored, dense type of tufa, as dripstone or flowstone, deposited in caves or around limy springs, lakes, or… …   English World dictionary

  • travertine — /trav euhr teen , tin/, n. a form of limestone deposited by springs, esp. hot springs, used in Italy for building. Also, travertin /trav euhr tin/. [1545 55; < It travertino, equiv. to tra across ( < L trans TRANS ) + (ti)vertino < L Tiburtinus,… …   Universalium

  • travertine — noun Etymology: French travertin, from Italian travertino, trevertino, from Latin tiburtinus, adjective, of travertine, literally, of Tibur (Tivoli) Date: 1730 a mineral consisting of a massive usually layered calcium carbonate (as aragonite or… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • travertine —    A limestone characterized by irregularly shaped hollows. It is used most for architecture (often cladding other materials), and is also used for outdoor sculpture. Travertine is quarried in the Tiber Valley near Rome …   Glossary of Art Terms

  • Travertine Spa Hotel & Club — (Памуккале,Турция) Категория отеля: Адрес: Mehmet Akif Ersoy Bulvarı No …   Каталог отелей

  • travertine — noun a) Any of several light, porous forms of calcite deposited from solution; found most often as stalactites and stalagmites. b) A similar form of limestone used as a facing material in building …   Wiktionary

  • travertine — n. type of limestone deposited at the mouth of a spring …   English contemporary dictionary

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